Our law firm recently worked a pro bono landlord-tenant dispute that was referred to us by Legal Aid of North Carolina.  We represented a low income family who was being evicted by a landlord in the Charlotte, NC area who was accused of engaging in retaliatory eviction, and violating the implied warranty of habitability, and committing unfair and deceptive trade practices by charging illegal rent under the Housing Code of the City of Charlotte.  Associate Andrea Solorzano devoted approximately 17 hours to the case, and her fluency with Spanish-speaking clients proved invaluable in helping her to successfully represent and defend these clients.  With the help of our law firm, the client family was able to bring out facts showing that the landlord in question failed to address HVAC complaints, failed to fix inoperable locks on windows and doors, as well as repair torn/missing window screens and glass, and fix plumbing leaks in the bathroom and kitchen, among other complaints.  Under local and state law, landlords cannot charge full rent for rental properties that do not meet minimum housing standards, especially after being given written notice of the defects.  The parties in this particular case were able to reach an amicable resolution, resulting in dismissal of all claims, and an order vacating the magistrate’s underlying order for eviction, and a rent refund.